Skip to content

Anthephora laevis

3.7 Vulnerable

name of participantsBased on: "The Red Book of Israeli Plants - Threatened Plants in Israel" by Prof. Avi Shmida, Dr. Gadi Pollack and Dr. Ori Fragman-Sapir
Update Time: Aug. 21, 2023, 4:32 p.m.

Anthephora laevis grows in the
Judean desert near the Dead Sea at a single site in the cliffs above the Madin
Ruins. There are an estimated two sites in Israel. The species was discovered
for the first time in 1980 on the cliffs above the large Ziziphus at the
Madin Ruins. The species was not found in the 1990s and was believed to be
extinct, but on March 5, 2002 three blooming individuals were found at exactly
the same spot. Efforts to find other population along the cliffs of the Judean
Desert and the Elat Mountains were unsuccessful, even though the plant can be
easily identified by its narrow long glabrous inflorescence that bears black
spikelets.

Rock pockets on hard
limestone stepped cliffs, on steep slopes along the Dead Sea shores. The area
has an annual precipitation of 100 mm and extremely high summer temperatures.

Anthephora laevis plant grows at a
single site and the small number of plants (three) exposes it to random
extinction. The plant is protected in HaHe'etekim Cliff Nature Reserve.

The Anthephora
laevis

population at its single site should be monitored and plants
propagated in the refuge garden at the En Gedi Nature Reserve.

According to the
Flora Palaestina
Anthephora
laevis
has a Sudanian distribution, but the species is not
mentioned in the Flora of East Africa and of the Horn of Africa. In its place
four other species of
Anthephora are noted from East Africa, two of which also grow on the
Horn of Africa and their distribution crosses the Red Sea eastwards towards
Yemen and Arabia (A. nigritana is similar to our taxon, but has hairy
glumes).
A. laevis is known from the Flora of Tropical Africa from Mali and
Nigeria. It does not grow in countries neighboring Israel – Egypt, Sinai and
the Arabian Peninsula.

Anthephora laevis is a perennial
African grain that grows on the Judean Desert cliffs near the Dead Sea whose
population numbers only a few plants at a single site in the country – an
extreme northern point of the species global range, fragmented from its main
distribution area in Africa with the largest geographical disjunction known
between Sudanian plants in Israel.

שמידע, א ואור, י. 1983. הצמחייה הסודנית בישראל. רתם 8: 1-107.
שמידע, א. 1986. הצמחייה הסודנית - פלישה חדשה או שריד מיוקני קדום. רתם 20: 76-111.
Shmida, A. and A. Aronson, 1986. The Sudanian elements in the flora of Israel. Ann. Missouri Bot. Gardens 73: 1-28.

name of participantsBased on: "The Red Book of Israeli Plants - Threatened Plants in Israel" by Prof. Avi Shmida, Dr. Gadi Pollack and Dr. Ori Fragman-Sapir

Current Occupancy Map

Current occupancy map for observations per pixel
1000 squre meter pixel 5000 squre meter pixel 10000 squre meter pixel
number of observations 0 0 0
in total pixels 0 0 0

FamilyGramineae
ClassificationOn the endangered species list
EcosystemDesert
ChorotypeSudanian
Conservation SiteMadin Ruins

Rarity
1
6
6
Vulnerability
0
0
4
Attractiveness
0
0
4
Endemism
0
0
4
Red number
1
3.7
10
Peripherality S
IUCN category DD EW EX LC CR EN VU NT
Threat Definition according to the red book Vulnerable
1 (1) districts
Disjunctiveness: 0
0.0% of protected sites

Other Species

Michelii Oat Grass
Antinoria insularis
Pond Lovegrass
Swamp Lovegrass